Dog Collar Sensitivity

It is natural for us to think that all dogs can wear a collar with no problems; however, some dogs are senstive about wearing a collar as well as letting anyone tug on it. Many dog bites occur because the act of grabbing the dogs collar or even wearing a lead startles the dog. Today we are going to work on desensitizing your dog to collar grabs. Got your treats? Let’s get started.

Pick a quiet place away from distractions to work with your dog.

Ask him to sit (if he knows that command) and give him several treats without touching him.

Next touch his head with one hand and give him a treat with the other.

Now, touch under his chin and reward with the other hand.

Continue touching and treating, gradually moving closer and closer to his collar.

Once your dog is comfortable with being rubbed around and under the collar, start moving the collar back and forth. You will want to work up in time to how long you can move the collar or grab at it.

Keep training sessions short, 5 minutes or so to keep both you and the dog comfortable.

If you have a non-aggressive puppy you can approach this in a different way by frequently interrupting play sessions by taking your puppy by the collar, asking him to sit, praising him, offering a treat, and then letting him go back to play.

Repeat this throughout the day, reaching for his collar faster and faster the more you practice.

Dog Trick Fun!

Johann the dog published this the other day. She has a really nice blog about dog agility, so don’t forget to check it out. I know all of you are always looking for new tricks to teach your dogs and I thought this would be a great way to build a list of common tricks for everyone to use. Don’t forget to pass it along so we can get a great list!

——-Copy and paste starting with this line and everything below———-

There are all kinds of fun tricks for us dogs, right? Well, let’s make a list! And share it with the dog world!

Here’s how it works:

1.) Copy and paste this post beginning with the “copy and paste” line at the top of the post to the “copy and paste” line at the end of the post, courtesy of Johann The Dog!

2.) Substitute the Host Tag (see below) and one of the vacant “Tricks” spots with the name of your dog trick and the URL of your blog, just like I did.

3.) When you find out that someone has added this link post to their blog and their trick isn’t listed on your post, practice good paw and add their link in one of your “Tricks” slots, by copying his/her ‘Host Tag’ and paste it over one of your “Tricks” slots below, and republish. This makes the list the same on everyone’s blog!

5.) Encourage and invite your readers to do the same and soon this can grow fast. And if your not a dog, but you blog about dogs, or own a dog, you are also welcome to participate!

Host Tag: Cover Your Eyes – Tummy Scratch!

1. Danger! (run and sit between your 2-leggers legs) – JohannTheDog
2. Rollover – Rescue Me
3. Beg – Raise a Green Dog
4. Bang! (play dead) – Fun Dog Tricks
5. Jump over 2-leggers’ Back – Pacco de Mongrel
6. Cover Your Eyes – Tummy Scratch!
7. Super chase dogs – Gus & Louie
8. Push the door closed – Jake’s Progress
9. Trick
10. Trick
11. Trick
12. Trick
13. Trick
14. Trick
15. Trick
16. Trick
17. Trick
18. Trick
19. Trick
20. Trick

There it is! It’s as easy as that! I hope to make lots new friends with this project and learn about all kinds of new tricks I can learn! Please leave a comment here if you have added this project to your blog, so that I can add you to the list!

—————Copy and paste this line and above——————

Teach Your Dog to Stay

Ok so you’ve mastered the sit command and the down command, great job! Now it’s time to teach your dog to sit or lie down for a short period of time. A perfect stay command is usually perceived as a sign of a well-mannered dog.

The stay command teaches your dog to maintain her position until you give her the ok to move. Got your tasty treats? Ok, let’s do it!

  1. Tell your dog to sit.
  2. Put your hand in front of your dog’s face and tell her “Stay.”
  3. Take a step back from your dog. Repeat, “Stay.”
  4. Wait a couple of seconds then return to your dog and say, “Ok.” Praise her, give her a treat and THEN let her move. If you give her the treat after she has moved, she will think that she is getting the treat FOR moving not for staying.
  5. Repeat this over the next few days. When your dog seems to have gotten the idea, you can increase the distance and the amount of time you have your dog stay. Start with the amount of time that she stays first, then you can increase the distance.

Stay will become old hat to her, boring, and easy as pie. Once you have mastered time and distance, then, put your hand in front of her face while saying stay and walk all the way around her. She may want to try to get up and go with you. If she attempts to get up, say “no, sit”, and push your hand in front of her again while saying stay. This will teach her that is it okay to be approached from all sides while she is in the stay position.

Teach Your Dog or Cat to Sit

Sit, is the first and most basic command to teach. Actually, it is quite easy. As always, you will need your supply of tasty treats and 5-10 minutes a day to practice.

While your dog or cat is standing in front of you, show him the treat. Hold it just above his nose. When he sees it, move it backward toward his bottom. He should naturally follow it with his head and to do so, will put his bottom on the ground. As he lowers his bottom, say sit. When he sits, reward him with praise and a treat. Repeat.

6 Dog Training Tips That Alter Negative Behavior

Dog TrainingAlmost every dog owner will have to use some sort of behavior modification techniques at one time or another when training their prized pet. If you are able to understand why your dog does what he does, when he does it, you are one step closer to solving the problem. This article will detail six ways of doing just that, in a general fashion that can be used for a wide variety of issues.

Tip #1: It’s All about Control

Let your dog know who is in charge, and you’ve alleviated a lot of problems. It’s not about fighting for control, it’s about knowing who has it. So when it’s time to train your dog, put on his training collar so he’s fully aware of what time it is. Alternatively, use a leash when walking your dog, so that he knows who is boss all of the time.

Tip #2: Reframe the Negative

Instead of telling your dog, “NO” for something bad he’s done, try and reframe the negative into something positive instead. For instance, if your dog decided to run after a chipmunk running across your lawn, try, “Sit” instead of whatever you’d normally use. Now you can praise him as well for his good behavior, instead of yelling at him because he didn’t stop.

Tip #3: Allow for Differences in Perception

Your dog may not think that digging is a bad behavior, but you and your garden probably do. Instead of getting upset, why not provide your dog with adequate digging space elsewhere, complete with buried treasures? Then, you can do the same as dog training tip number two, and provide positive feedback when he digs in the allotted space, and not in your flower garden.

Tip #4: Use Consistency

Make Sure the Whole Household Acts Consistently When you are training your dog, make sure that everyone in the house knows what you are doing, and how to provide supportive measures when needed. That means that if you are teaching the word sit, then everyone in the house should know what to do, when to do it, and why if a behavior presents itself where the command should be used.

Tip #5: Keep Moving

Many behavioral issues with dogs lie behind the fact that they don’t get out enough for a long walk or run. Make sure to take them out on a regular basis (daily, if at all possible) to somewhere new that he can explore on his own time.

Tip #6: Keep it Simple

The more clear you are with your dog while training him, the better off everyone will be. Show your dog what you are asking him to do, instead of just telling him. Give the command at the same time while you show him (gently, of course) and ensure that your body language matches your words.

Why You Should Keep Your Dog on a Leash & Leash Training

Dog Training

I have a neighbor who lets his little Maltese and his Collie run free. It bugs me to no end, considering the city does have a leash law. The Collie I don’t mind so much, he keeps his distance, but that Maltese is a mean little bugger. What if the kids are playing outside when he decides to come by? I don’t want one of them getting bit! He has tried to bite my fiancee more than once!

When a dog is on a leash, you are in control. It shows the dog that you are the leader because you decide where you’re going and what is allowed on a walk. Not only that, but it keeps your dog safe by not allowing him to chase squirrels, etc. on a doggie whim. What if he ran off after a squirrel into the street and oncoming traffic? More likely than not he would ignore your commands and keep chasing the squirrel, right?

Teaching your dog to walk properly on a leash is not a hard task. It can be done with a few basic dog obedience classes and a little patience. The first commands to teach your puppy are sit and stay. The most important thing is to never reward your puppy for pulling on the leash.

Things you will need to train your puppy include: Lots of yummy treats, a 4-6 foot leash, a regular buckle collar or a puppy harness, and lots of patience.

To begin leash training you want to do it either in the house or in the yard, and be sure to have lots of yummy treats on hand! Once these first commands are learned, you can give your puppy the command and then put on his leash. If your puppy bolts as soon as the leash is clasp on, stand still and allow the puppy to calm down and stop pulling, jumping, etc. This could take a few minutes, so be patient. Once the puppy calms down, call him to you and when he comes, have him sit, then praise him for being good and give him a treat.

Take your first step, but don’t go toward the door. If your puppy stays calm and doesn’t pull, praise him and take another step. If he doesn’t , stand still until he calms down, call him to you, and have him sit. Once he sits, praise him and give him a treat. Repeat the process until you are able to walk with a calm, non-pulling puppy. When you feel you and the puppy are ready for an actual walk, try the great outdoors and remember if puppy starts pulling, stop and wait for him to calm down, call him to you have have him sit before proceeding on your walk.

If you do this consistently, the dog learns two things: (1) if he stays near you or looks at you, he gets treats and he gets to keep moving, and (2) if he pulls on the leash, it’s a pain in the butt because he doesn’t get to keep moving AND he has to come back to you and sit.

** If your dog is RUNNING at full speed toward the end of the leash, you could inflict physical damage to his neck if you allow him to check himself against the leash without giving him any slack. Allow your arm to absorb most of the force so the dog is surprised but not harmed.